TSA

Second Double Bass Smashed at Atlanta Airport This Week [SHOCK]

Reposted from the Violin Channel.   Only days after American bassist Karl Fenner published alarming photos on social media of his badly damaged instrument, following a US flight from Atlanta to Denver, University of Georgia faculty member, Milton Masciadri has today posted similar images of his beheaded double bass – following a flight via the same airport. Mr Masciardri has indicated he was travelling from Atlanta to Arkansas, on Monday when the neck of his 18th Century Carlo Antonio Testore double bass was severed in transit – believed to have been caused by a Transport Security Administration (TSA) officer failing to reattach the case restraining belt following a routine inspection. ‘In my case they failed to put the restraining belt on the neck of the bass after inspection,” Masciardri has scorned angrily on social media, ” … this is the second instrument broken [...]

By |2019-05-26T04:11:54+00:00September 29th, 2015|Categories: Cello Travel, News|Tags: , , , , |

Air Travel with Musical Instruments: Final Ruling!

Reposted from BMI News. As of March 6, 2015, it’s official and no longer at the discretion of the various airlines. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, musicians who board planes must be allowed to carry on their instruments provided they fit in the overhead bin. If this space isn’t large enough, the musician is also permitted to purchase a second seat in which to stow their musical companion. One caveat: the airlines don’t have to prioritize musical instruments ahead of any other carry-on luggage, so if the bins are full, you’ll still have to check your instrument at the gate. To remedy this, the DoT suggests that musicians may want to pay the airline’s fee for priority boarding to ensure that there will be room for their gear. [...]

By |2017-10-30T04:58:34+00:00March 19th, 2015|Categories: Cello Travel|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Top Cellist’s Bow is Damaged by US Airport Security — by Paul Katz

Here is the latest travel outrage! Personally, I have never let a security agent handle my instrument and have developed a standard speech that so far, has always worked: "Sorry sir/madam, this instrument is extremely valuable and fragile and that is why I don't check it in baggage. I'm glad to open and close the case for you and let you inspect it thoroughly. But I will hold the instrument for you. If you need to touch the wood, please take off your ring, and be careful your fingernails don't scratch the varnish." That seems to impress them enough that they behave! —Paul Katz Top Cellist's Bow is Damaged: Alban Gerhardt Calls Airport Security Staff "Brutal and Careless". Reprinted from The Strad - Friday, 08 February 2013 Photo: courtesy [...]

Cello Is My Co-Pilot (Part 2) — by Jeffrey Zeigler

I am, of course, a cellist writing to other cellists. So discussing the torment that we all have to go through when we travel with our instruments is, naturally, preaching to the choir. In fact, I wrote a blog post here on CelloBello a few years ago on the topic hoping to give some helpful tips to cellists (Cello Is My Co-Pilot). And in addition to my post, there are quite a few individuals that have written many extremely helpful articles and blogs geared at helping cellists all over the world deal with the hassles of travel. The information is definitely out there to know the basic guidelines that should be followed in order to handle pretty much 99% of the situations that one will face during air travel. So [...]

By |2017-10-30T05:19:02+00:00November 1st, 2012|Categories: Cello Travel|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

Cello Is My Co-Pilot (Part 1) — by Jeffrey Zeigler

Several years back I was flying out of the Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. My cello was strapped into the seat next to me and I was ready to go. Lost in my own thoughts, a flight attendant leaned over and asked me very nicely if I was flying with an oboe. Now, I have flown a great deal with my cello over the years and have conditioned myself to be ready for whatever excuses the flight attendant brings in order to hassle me. But I had never ever heard of a cello being confused with an oboe! In complete shock, my only reaction was a nervous laugh. It was right then that I realized that she was actually quite serious and I immediately apologized. But honestly, where had she thought up [...]